South Newsletters

Dukes and Duchesses

March 2 is Dr. Seuss’ Birthday

 

 

It was 1960, Green Eggs and Ham was published, and Theodor Geisel (who you may more readily know as Dr. Seuss) implored, In these days of tension and confusion, writers are beginning to realize that Books for Children have a greater potential for good, or evil, than any other form of literature on earth.”

Dr. Seuss had written Horton Hears a Who some years prior to Green Eggs and Ham as a way to connect to young readers in a positive way. His art had experienced quite a shift from the derisive propaganda cartoons and film he had published as part of the war effort.  He wanted to effect change in society’s buds, our children.

He would go on to publish The Sneetches in 1961 with its civil rights theme, and ten years later, The Lorax, raising environmental awareness.

We can continue this important work in our homes and classrooms by teaching our children to be safe, kind, and responsible.  We can encourage activities that show we value each other for our similarities and our differences.

Read more

I Love You Rituals

 

 

 

A wonderful woman who lived in a shoe,
She had so many children she knew exactly what to do.
She held them. She rocked them, and tucked them in bed.
“I love you, I love you” is what she said.

-Dr. Becky Bailey

Dr. Becky Bailey’s book, I Love You Rituals details how to build strong connections between children and parents, children and caregivers/teachers, and between each other.  One of our many jobs at the Academy of Early Childhood Learning Centers is to help children to build trusting, safe relationships.  Her variation of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star, for example, teaches children how to be kind and caring using gentle touches.  You may have your own rituals you implement at home.  Some traditional examples would be reading a bedtime story and tucking your child into bed.  What rituals are important to you?

Everyone needs to feel their relevance and value are recognized; in their homes, their classroom or at work, and in the hearts of those around them.

Read more

Jesters

 

March 2 is Dr. Seuss’ Birthday

 

 

It was 1960, Green Eggs and Ham was published, and Theodor Geisel (who you may more readily know as Dr. Seuss) implored, In these days of tension and confusion, writers are beginning to realize that Books for Children have a greater potential for good, or evil, than any other form of literature on earth.”

Dr. Seuss had written Horton Hears a Who some years prior to Green Eggs and Ham as a way to connect to young readers in a positive way. His art had experienced quite a shift from the derisive propaganda cartoons and film he had published as part of the war effort.  He wanted to effect change in society’s buds, our children.

He would go on to publish The Sneetches in 1961 with its civil rights theme, and ten years later, The Lorax, raising environmental awareness.

We can continue this important work in our homes and classrooms by teaching our children to be safe, kind, and responsible.  We can encourage activities that show we value each other for our similarities and our differences.

Read more

I Love You Rituals

 

 

 

A wonderful woman who lived in a shoe,
She had so many children she knew exactly what to do.
She held them. She rocked them, and tucked them in bed.
“I love you, I love you” is what she said.

-Dr. Becky Bailey

Dr. Becky Bailey’s book, I Love You Rituals details how to build strong connections between children and parents, children and caregivers/teachers, and between each other.  One of our many jobs at the Academy of Early Childhood Learning Centers is to help children to build trusting, safe relationships.  Her variation of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star, for example, teaches children how to be kind and caring using gentle touches.  You may have your own rituals you implement at home.  Some traditional examples would be reading a bedtime story and tucking your child into bed.  What rituals are important to you?

Everyone needs to feel their relevance and value are recognized; in their homes, their classroom or at work, and in the hearts of those around them.

Read more

Knights and Maidens

 

March 2 is Dr. Seuss’ Birthday

 

 

It was 1960, Green Eggs and Ham was published, and Theodor Geisel (who you may more readily know as Dr. Seuss) implored, In these days of tension and confusion, writers are beginning to realize that Books for Children have a greater potential for good, or evil, than any other form of literature on earth.”

Dr. Seuss had written Horton Hears a Who some years prior to Green Eggs and Ham as a way to connect to young readers in a positive way. His art had experienced quite a shift from the derisive propaganda cartoons and film he had published as part of the war effort.  He wanted to effect change in society’s buds, our children.

He would go on to publish The Sneetches in 1961 with its civil rights theme, and ten years later, The Lorax, raising environmental awareness.

We can continue this important work in our homes and classrooms by teaching our children to be safe, kind, and responsible.  We can encourage activities that show we value each other for our similarities and our differences.

Read more

I Love You Rituals

 

 

 

A wonderful woman who lived in a shoe,
She had so many children she knew exactly what to do.
She held them. She rocked them, and tucked them in bed.
“I love you, I love you” is what she said.

-Dr. Becky Bailey

Dr. Becky Bailey’s book, I Love You Rituals details how to build strong connections between children and parents, children and caregivers/teachers, and between each other.  One of our many jobs at the Academy of Early Childhood Learning Centers is to help children to build trusting, safe relationships.  Her variation of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star, for example, teaches children how to be kind and caring using gentle touches.  You may have your own rituals you implement at home.  Some traditional examples would be reading a bedtime story and tucking your child into bed.  What rituals are important to you?

Everyone needs to feel their relevance and value are recognized; in their homes, their classroom or at work, and in the hearts of those around them.

Read more

Lords and Ladies

March 2 is Dr. Seuss’ Birthday

 

 

It was 1960, Green Eggs and Ham was published, and Theodor Geisel (who you may more readily know as Dr. Seuss) implored, In these days of tension and confusion, writers are beginning to realize that Books for Children have a greater potential for good, or evil, than any other form of literature on earth.”

Dr. Seuss had written Horton Hears a Who some years prior to Green Eggs and Ham as a way to connect to young readers in a positive way. His art had experienced quite a shift from the derisive propaganda cartoons and film he had published as part of the war effort.  He wanted to effect change in society’s buds, our children.

He would go on to publish The Sneetches in 1961 with its civil rights theme, and ten years later, The Lorax, raising environmental awareness.

We can continue this important work in our homes and classrooms by teaching our children to be safe, kind, and responsible.  We can encourage activities that show we value each other for our similarities and our differences.

Read more

I Love You Rituals

 

 

 

A wonderful woman who lived in a shoe,
She had so many children she knew exactly what to do.
She held them. She rocked them, and tucked them in bed.
“I love you, I love you” is what she said.

-Dr. Becky Bailey

Dr. Becky Bailey’s book, I Love You Rituals details how to build strong connections between children and parents, children and caregivers/teachers, and between each other.  One of our many jobs at the Academy of Early Childhood Learning Centers is to help children to build trusting, safe relationships.  Her variation of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star, for example, teaches children how to be kind and caring using gentle touches.  You may have your own rituals you implement at home.  Some traditional examples would be reading a bedtime story and tucking your child into bed.  What rituals are important to you?

Everyone needs to feel their relevance and value are recognized; in their homes, their classroom or at work, and in the hearts of those around them.

Read more

Nobles

March 2 is Dr. Seuss’ Birthday

 

 

It was 1960, Green Eggs and Ham was published, and Theodor Geisel (who you may more readily know as Dr. Seuss) implored, In these days of tension and confusion, writers are beginning to realize that Books for Children have a greater potential for good, or evil, than any other form of literature on earth.”

Dr. Seuss had written Horton Hears a Who some years prior to Green Eggs and Ham as a way to connect to young readers in a positive way. His art had experienced quite a shift from the derisive propaganda cartoons and film he had published as part of the war effort.  He wanted to effect change in society’s buds, our children.

He would go on to publish The Sneetches in 1961 with its civil rights theme, and ten years later, The Lorax, raising environmental awareness.

We can continue this important work in our homes and classrooms by teaching our children to be safe, kind, and responsible.  We can encourage activities that show we value each other for our similarities and our differences.

Read more

I Love You Rituals

 

 

 

A wonderful woman who lived in a shoe,
She had so many children she knew exactly what to do.
She held them. She rocked them, and tucked them in bed.
“I love you, I love you” is what she said.

-Dr. Becky Bailey

Dr. Becky Bailey’s book, I Love You Rituals details how to build strong connections between children and parents, children and caregivers/teachers, and between each other.  One of our many jobs at the Academy of Early Childhood Learning Centers is to help children to build trusting, safe relationships.  Her variation of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star, for example, teaches children how to be kind and caring using gentle touches.  You may have your own rituals you implement at home.  Some traditional examples would be reading a bedtime story and tucking your child into bed.  What rituals are important to you?

Everyone needs to feel their relevance and value are recognized; in their homes, their classroom or at work, and in the hearts of those around them.

Read more

Pages

 

March 2 is Dr. Seuss’ Birthday

 

 

It was 1960, Green Eggs and Ham was published, and Theodor Geisel (who you may more readily know as Dr. Seuss) implored, In these days of tension and confusion, writers are beginning to realize that Books for Children have a greater potential for good, or evil, than any other form of literature on earth.”

Dr. Seuss had written Horton Hears a Who some years prior to Green Eggs and Ham as a way to connect to young readers in a positive way. His art had experienced quite a shift from the derisive propaganda cartoons and film he had published as part of the war effort.  He wanted to effect change in society’s buds, our children.

He would go on to publish The Sneetches in 1961 with its civil rights theme, and ten years later, The Lorax, raising environmental awareness.

We can continue this important work in our homes and classrooms by teaching our children to be safe, kind, and responsible.  We can encourage activities that show we value each other for our similarities and our differences.

Read more

I Love You Rituals

 

 

 

A wonderful woman who lived in a shoe,
She had so many children she knew exactly what to do.
She held them. She rocked them, and tucked them in bed.
“I love you, I love you” is what she said.

-Dr. Becky Bailey

Dr. Becky Bailey’s book, I Love You Rituals details how to build strong connections between children and parents, children and caregivers/teachers, and between each other.  One of our many jobs at the Academy of Early Childhood Learning Centers is to help children to build trusting, safe relationships.  Her variation of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star, for example, teaches children how to be kind and caring using gentle touches.  You may have your own rituals you implement at home.  Some traditional examples would be reading a bedtime story and tucking your child into bed.  What rituals are important to you?

Everyone needs to feel their relevance and value are recognized; in their homes, their classroom or at work, and in the hearts of those around them.

Read more

Pixies

March 2 is Dr. Seuss’ Birthday

 

 

It was 1960, Green Eggs and Ham was published, and Theodor Geisel (who you may more readily know as Dr. Seuss) implored, In these days of tension and confusion, writers are beginning to realize that Books for Children have a greater potential for good, or evil, than any other form of literature on earth.”

Dr. Seuss had written Horton Hears a Who some years prior to Green Eggs and Ham as a way to connect to young readers in a positive way. His art had experienced quite a shift from the derisive propaganda cartoons and film he had published as part of the war effort.  He wanted to effect change in society’s buds, our children.

He would go on to publish The Sneetches in 1961 with its civil rights theme, and ten years later, The Lorax, raising environmental awareness.

We can continue this important work in our homes and classrooms by teaching our children to be safe, kind, and responsible.  We can encourage activities that show we value each other for our similarities and our differences.

Read more

I Love You Rituals

 

 

 

A wonderful woman who lived in a shoe,
She had so many children she knew exactly what to do.
She held them. She rocked them, and tucked them in bed.
“I love you, I love you” is what she said.

-Dr. Becky Bailey

Dr. Becky Bailey’s book, I Love You Rituals details how to build strong connections between children and parents, children and caregivers/teachers, and between each other.  One of our many jobs at the Academy of Early Childhood Learning Centers is to help children to build trusting, safe relationships.  Her variation of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star, for example, teaches children how to be kind and caring using gentle touches.  You may have your own rituals you implement at home.  Some traditional examples would be reading a bedtime story and tucking your child into bed.  What rituals are important to you?

Everyone needs to feel their relevance and value are recognized; in their homes, their classroom or at work, and in the hearts of those around them.

Read more

Sentries

March 2 is Dr. Seuss’ Birthday

 

 

It was 1960, Green Eggs and Ham was published, and Theodor Geisel (who you may more readily know as Dr. Seuss) implored, In these days of tension and confusion, writers are beginning to realize that Books for Children have a greater potential for good, or evil, than any other form of literature on earth.”

Dr. Seuss had written Horton Hears a Who some years prior to Green Eggs and Ham as a way to connect to young readers in a positive way. His art had experienced quite a shift from the derisive propaganda cartoons and film he had published as part of the war effort.  He wanted to effect change in society’s buds, our children.

He would go on to publish The Sneetches in 1961 with its civil rights theme, and ten years later, The Lorax, raising environmental awareness.

We can continue this important work in our homes and classrooms by teaching our children to be safe, kind, and responsible.  We can encourage activities that show we value each other for our similarities and our differences.

Read more

I Love You Rituals

 

 

 

A wonderful woman who lived in a shoe,
She had so many children she knew exactly what to do.
She held them. She rocked them, and tucked them in bed.
“I love you, I love you” is what she said.

-Dr. Becky Bailey

Dr. Becky Bailey’s book, I Love You Rituals details how to build strong connections between children and parents, children and caregivers/teachers, and between each other.  One of our many jobs at the Academy of Early Childhood Learning Centers is to help children to build trusting, safe relationships.  Her variation of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star, for example, teaches children how to be kind and caring using gentle touches.  You may have your own rituals you implement at home.  Some traditional examples would be reading a bedtime story and tucking your child into bed.  What rituals are important to you?

Everyone needs to feel their relevance and value are recognized; in their homes, their classroom or at work, and in the hearts of those around them.

Read more

Spartans

 

March 2 is Dr. Seuss’ Birthday

 

 

It was 1960, Green Eggs and Ham was published, and Theodor Geisel (who you may more readily know as Dr. Seuss) implored, In these days of tension and confusion, writers are beginning to realize that Books for Children have a greater potential for good, or evil, than any other form of literature on earth.”

Dr. Seuss had written Horton Hears a Who some years prior to Green Eggs and Ham as a way to connect to young readers in a positive way. His art had experienced quite a shift from the derisive propaganda cartoons and film he had published as part of the war effort.  He wanted to effect change in society’s buds, our children.

He would go on to publish The Sneetches in 1961 with its civil rights theme, and ten years later, The Lorax, raising environmental awareness.

We can continue this important work in our homes and classrooms by teaching our children to be safe, kind, and responsible.  We can encourage activities that show we value each other for our similarities and our differences.

Read more

I Love You Rituals

 

 

 

A wonderful woman who lived in a shoe,
She had so many children she knew exactly what to do.
She held them. She rocked them, and tucked them in bed.
“I love you, I love you” is what she said.

-Dr. Becky Bailey

Dr. Becky Bailey’s book, I Love You Rituals details how to build strong connections between children and parents, children and caregivers/teachers, and between each other.  One of our many jobs at the Academy of Early Childhood Learning Centers is to help children to build trusting, safe relationships.  Her variation of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star, for example, teaches children how to be kind and caring using gentle touches.  You may have your own rituals you implement at home.  Some traditional examples would be reading a bedtime story and tucking your child into bed.  What rituals are important to you?

Everyone needs to feel their relevance and value are recognized; in their homes, their classroom or at work, and in the hearts of those around them.

Read more

Sprites

 

March 2 is Dr. Seuss’ Birthday

 

 

It was 1960, Green Eggs and Ham was published, and Theodor Geisel (who you may more readily know as Dr. Seuss) implored, In these days of tension and confusion, writers are beginning to realize that Books for Children have a greater potential for good, or evil, than any other form of literature on earth.”

Dr. Seuss had written Horton Hears a Who some years prior to Green Eggs and Ham as a way to connect to young readers in a positive way. His art had experienced quite a shift from the derisive propaganda cartoons and film he had published as part of the war effort.  He wanted to effect change in society’s buds, our children.

He would go on to publish The Sneetches in 1961 with its civil rights theme, and ten years later, The Lorax, raising environmental awareness.

We can continue this important work in our homes and classrooms by teaching our children to be safe, kind, and responsible.  We can encourage activities that show we value each other for our similarities and our differences.

Read more

I Love You Rituals

 

 

 

A wonderful woman who lived in a shoe,
She had so many children she knew exactly what to do.
She held them. She rocked them, and tucked them in bed.
“I love you, I love you” is what she said.

-Dr. Becky Bailey

Dr. Becky Bailey’s book, I Love You Rituals details how to build strong connections between children and parents, children and caregivers/teachers, and between each other.  One of our many jobs at the Academy of Early Childhood Learning Centers is to help children to build trusting, safe relationships.  Her variation of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star, for example, teaches children how to be kind and caring using gentle touches.  You may have your own rituals you implement at home.  Some traditional examples would be reading a bedtime story and tucking your child into bed.  What rituals are important to you?

Everyone needs to feel their relevance and value are recognized; in their homes, their classroom or at work, and in the hearts of those around them.

Read more

Squires

 

March 2 is Dr. Seuss’ Birthday

 

 

It was 1960, Green Eggs and Ham was published, and Theodor Geisel (who you may more readily know as Dr. Seuss) implored, In these days of tension and confusion, writers are beginning to realize that Books for Children have a greater potential for good, or evil, than any other form of literature on earth.”

Dr. Seuss had written Horton Hears a Who some years prior to Green Eggs and Ham as a way to connect to young readers in a positive way. His art had experienced quite a shift from the derisive propaganda cartoons and film he had published as part of the war effort.  He wanted to effect change in society’s buds, our children.

He would go on to publish The Sneetches in 1961 with its civil rights theme, and ten years later, The Lorax, raising environmental awareness.

We can continue this important work in our homes and classrooms by teaching our children to be safe, kind, and responsible.  We can encourage activities that show we value each other for our similarities and our differences.

Read more

I Love You Rituals

 

 

 

A wonderful woman who lived in a shoe,
She had so many children she knew exactly what to do.
She held them. She rocked them, and tucked them in bed.
“I love you, I love you” is what she said.

-Dr. Becky Bailey

Dr. Becky Bailey’s book, I Love You Rituals details how to build strong connections between children and parents, children and caregivers/teachers, and between each other.  One of our many jobs at the Academy of Early Childhood Learning Centers is to help children to build trusting, safe relationships.  Her variation of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star, for example, teaches children how to be kind and caring using gentle touches.  You may have your own rituals you implement at home.  Some traditional examples would be reading a bedtime story and tucking your child into bed.  What rituals are important to you?

Everyone needs to feel their relevance and value are recognized; in their homes, their classroom or at work, and in the hearts of those around them.

Read more